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  • Sam Drazin
    Creating Exclusions2
    Topic posted November 23, 2011 by Sam DrazinExpert, tagged how-to in Wireless Workbench > All Questions & Answers Topics public
    Title:
    Creating Exclusions
    Description:

    Overview

    Exclusions are inputs into the frequency calculator that disallow active devices and backup frequencies from being tuned to those specific values, and can be specified as single frequencies or frequency ranges. You can create three different types of exclusions:

    • TV Exclusions
    • Scan Data Exclusions
    • Manual Exclusions

    Related Links:

    Creating TV Exclusions

    There are two primary methods which allow you to avoid the RF interference associated with near-by TV stations. The first of which is to use the built-in TV database. This database holds records for a large number of the TV antennas placed throughout the world. From the Frequency Coordination tab, select "Change TV Channels..." to access the TV Management dialog.

    593a77148b_01.png

    This dialog allows you to search by city/postal code, or specify precise latitude and longitude for your particular location. Once a location is established, a list of near-by TV stations will be selected based on the transmit power of the station, and it's proximity to the location specified.

    We'll walk through how to search for a postal code for a given city. First, ensure that "City" is selected as the Location Setup option. Then, choose the country in which you'd like to search.

    593a77148b_02.png

    If you know the postal code of your location, enter it in the Postal Code field, and select "Search".

    593a77148b_03.png

    If you don't know the postal code, enter the city name, and select the appropriate state from the State drop-down. Select "Find Postal Code". This will return a list of all available postal codes for that city in the Postal Code field. Select a postal code, and then select "Search".

    593a77148b_04.png

    Once "Search" has been selected, the TV Channel List will be populated with TV stations that are close enough to cause interference in the specified location. You have just created a list of TV exclusions. You can check additional channels from the list, uncheck some that were automatically selected, and export a list to share.

    Press "Save" to commit these TV Exclusions. Once saved, all checked channels will be completely avoided when calculating frequencies.

    593a77148b_05.png

    The Coordination Plot will reflect any excluded channels with red vertical bars. Each channel that was checked in the TV Management dialog will display one of these bars. The right sidebar will also summarize the total number of TV channels being avoided.

    593a77148b_06.png

    It is important to note that the exclusion ranges from TV exclusions are based on the location of TV channels and the known stations surrounding the location you specify. No live scan data will impact the designation of TV channels when selected from the TV Management dialog.

    To create exclusion ranges based on live scan data from the current RF environment, we'll walk through creating scan data exclusions

    Creating Scan Data Exclusions

    Scan data exclusions are exclusions the calculator will avoid based on scan data levels and the exclusion threshold. Let's define each of those briefly:

    • Scan data: data recorded by a device capable of scanning (AXT400, AXT600, UR4, P10R, etc) and saved in a file format, or displayed in Wireless Workbench live from the device.
    • Exclusion threshold: the threshold which decides whether RF energy at a certain frequency will be avoided or not. This is represented by the red horizontal line in the Coordination Plot within Wireless Workbench.

    Wireless Workbench can be configured to create exclusions when scan data is present in the Coordination Plot automatically. Open the Preferences menu and access the Coordination tab.

    593a77148b_07.png

    The setting is called "Automatically calculate exclusions from scan data". When checked, any scan data in the Coordination plot (the plot view inside the Frequency Coordination tab) will be used to generate a list of exclusion frequencies and ranges.

    Setting the exclusion threshold at different levels will alter the exclusions generated in real-time. This can be verified by changing the exclusion threshold, and noticing the number of excluded frequencies and ranges change in the right sidebar under the Additional Exclusions section.

    593a77148b_08.png

    All generated exclusions will be listed in the Exclusions dialog, accessible by selecting "Change Exclusions...". Here, you can enable/disable exclusions by selecting/deselecting them. Exclusion lists can also be exported and imported from this dialog.

    593a77148b_09.png

    Creating Manual Exclusions

    From the Exclusions dialog, you can add exclusions manually. Exclusions can be single frequencies, or frequency ranges. To add an exclusion, select "Change Exclusions..." from the Frequency Coordination right sidebar.

    593a77148b_10.png

    You will be presented with the current list of exclusions. To add a manual exclusion, select "Add New Row". A new row will be added to the bottom of the list.

    Select the type of exclusion as either a frequency (to avoid a single frequency value), or range (to avoid all frequencies between two frequency values, including the bounds).

    593a77148b_11.png

    For single frequency exclusions, only enter a value in the "Start" column. Ranges will require values in both the "Start" and "Stop" columns. Notice that the value of the "Source" field for the added row is "User Defined", indicating that this is a manually added exclusion.

    Press "Save" when you are done adding exclusions.

  • jmack
    TV station search defaults2
    Topic posted November 23, 2011 by jmackBeginner in Wireless Workbench > All Feature Request Topics public
    Title:
    TV station search defaults
    Description:
    Hi Guys
    On behalf of the metric population of the world I wish to request a change to the TV channels search window such that the search radius does not always default to miles. We can set the default country in coordination preferences now, which is awesome. Big improvement on WWB5. However it is a minor annoyance to always have to change the search radium units from miles to kilometres.

    Ideally I would like to see default units and default radius available under coordination preferences as I find the current default of 50 miles / 80 km too large for most applications.

    BTW; according to the National Institute of Standards and Technology, around 95% of the world use the metric system http://ts.nist.gov/W...ric/lc1136q.cfm

    So maybe we should put it to a vote. ;)

    Cheers

    Jeff MacKenzie
    Jands AU
  • AndyChan
    Alert if running different firmware versions?23.0
    Topic posted November 21, 2011 by AndyChanNovice in Wireless Workbench > All Feature Request Topics public
    Title:
    Alert if running different firmware versions?
    Description:
    Hi Sam, is there a feature in WWB 6.0 to automatically alert users if the connected Axient components are not running on the same firmware version?

    Don't know if this should be posted on feature request section, but I'll try here first. Thanks, Andy
  • Sam Drazin
    Reset Registry Settings
    Topic posted November 18, 2011 by Sam DrazinExpert, tagged how-to in Wireless Workbench > All Questions & Answers Topics public
    Title:
    Reset Registry Settings
    Description:

    Overview

    The Registry is a collection of saved parameters that relate specifically to your installed instance of Wireless Workbench. This collection of data keeps track of certain configuration choices you have made, and removes the need to duplicate the process of initializing preferences.

    In certain cases, it may be helpful to clear the registry, blanking Wireless Workbench's memory of your saved settings and configurations. This guide will show you how to clear your registry settings from within Wireless Workbench.

    Related Links

    Access

    There is a menu option you need to select to reset Wireless Workbench's registry settings. To access this command, launch Wireless Workbench 6. Hold the Shift key down, and click on the Tools menu. You will notice that a new menu appears (called "Diagnostics"). Within this Diagnostics menu, select "Delete Application Settings".

    410f044670_01.png

    An alert will pop up, warning you that resetting the registry will require Wireless Workbench to restart. Press "Reset" to proceed.

    410f044670_02.png

    Once Wireless Workbench has stopped running, relaunch it. Your registry settings have been reset.

  • Sam Drazin
    Methods of avoiding TV stations when coordinating freqs
    Topic posted November 15, 2011 by Sam DrazinExpert, tagged how-to in Wireless Workbench > All Questions & Answers Topics public
    Title:
    Methods of avoiding TV stations when coordinating freqs
    Description:

    Overview

    TV stations make up yet another series of obstacles to work around when coordinating frequencies. Depending on your geographic location, you may be heavily impacted by the transmission of one or more TV stations. This page will briefly discuss several methods of avoiding TV stations when performing Frequency Coordination.

    Related Links

    Avoiding TV Channels

    To avoid active TV channels in your vicinity, you might use any of the methods explained in the Creating Exclusions page to block off certain portions of the spectrum from use. In general, however, the most accurate depiction of your RF environment will be captured by running a live scan, and generating exclusions based off of that data.

    The TV database is a static file which calculates your proximity from local TV stations, and blocks out entire TV channels if they are close enough to present an issue. Using the TV Exclusions approach is often overly conservative, as many TV stations are very low power, or blocked by natural/man-made obstructions (mountain ranges, tall buildings, etc) such that they would not present any material interference.

    For this reason, it is recommended to always perform a live scan with a wide-band antenna system placed to optimally cover your area of wireless usage.

    Using the TV Exclusions database is an acceptable fallback plan if accurate scans cannot be taken of the RF environment in whcih you plan to operate your wireless equipment. When scanning is an option, however, there is no need to use TV exclusions. Scan data taken recently from the precise environment in which your gear will operate is the most accurate source of the present RF environment (assuming your hardware and antenna rig is functional and well-tuned).

    This being said, scan data is, by definition, time-dependent. You might take a scan of a venue and see no strong signals, and an hour later, become inundated with broadcast and ENG wireless systems and 2-way intercom communication that clutters your once-clear spectrum. To address this concern, use of the Frequency Plot should be made to constantly scan the spectrum.

  • Sam Drazin
    Re-deploying a Solution to a Spectrum Manager
    Topic posted November 15, 2011 by Sam DrazinExpert, tagged how-to in Wireless Workbench > All Questions & Answers Topics public
    Title:
    Re-deploying a Solution to a Spectrum Manager
    Description:

    Overview

    A powerful feature of Wireless Workbench is the ability to perform pre-show planning and frequency coordination without having access to your networked devices. Offline, you have full access to WWB6's frequency calculator, as well as the ability to configure a majority of the settings for your Shure wireless gear.

    This topic will describe how to take a coordination performed offline, and redeploy it to an online network of gear, including an AXT600 Spectrum Manager, when you arrive on site.

    Related Links

    Prerequisites

    This topic's content assumes that you have already performed and saved an offline coordination using Wireless Workbench 6. Consult the Frequency Coordination tutorial video for more information on how to get to this point.

    After a coordination has been performed, the offline versions of your devices and backup frequencies will be holding the frequency values that you'll likely want to maintain and deploy to the hardware. To get to this stage, you will have had to deploy coordination results to inventory without a Spectrum Manager available (ie: on the RF Coordination Results window, you will have selected the "None" option as the managing Spectrum Manager for each zone in your coordination).

    18edc5f27f_01.png

    Furthermore, the Compatible Frequency List (or CFL) that Wireless Workbench created as a result of frequency coordination can be sent to an available Spectrum Manager, which can then manage that list (dispatch frequencies to Axient receivers experiencing interference, and monitor backup frequencies for all devices). You want this. Let's walk through how to get there.

    Discover a Spectrum Manager

    You've run a frequency coordination offline, or online with gear at a previous time. You now show up to the venue, and want to push your perfect frequency list to the Spectrum Manager to take advantage of backup frequency monitoring, and automated frequency dispatching to AXT400 receivers.

    Launch Wireless Workbench and load your coordination (from a Show File). Notice that the devices in your inventory will be holding their frequency values from your calculated solution.

    18edc5f27f_02.png

    Connect your computer to the same network as the Spectrum Manager you will want to utilize. Ensure the Spectrum Manager is powered on, and that it shows up in your inventory view as an online device.

    18edc5f27f_03.png

    Fake a Coordination

    The next steps will walk you through "faking" a coordination in order to perform deployment: the essential step to transfer frequencies to your Spectrum Manager.

    In the Frequency Coordination tab, select "Manage Channels..." from the right sidebar.

    18edc5f27f_04.png

    The Channel Summary dialog will open. This dialog shows all frequencies that will be input into the next calculation. You want to tell the calculator that all channels (both active devices and backup frequencies) should maintain their current frequency values. To do this, uncheck all rows by selecting "None" from the Select section.

    18edc5f27f_05.png

    Press "Save" to close the Channel Summary dialog. On the bottom of the right sidebar of the Frequency Coordination tab, select "Calculate New Frequencies".

    18edc5f27f_06.png

    The RF Coordination Results dialog will open, but with slightly different content than usual.

    In bottom of the Summary section, notice that it says "None" in the space where the number of frequencies found are usually listed. This is because we did not calculate any new frequencies (all channels were left on their current frequency values).

    Here is the critical step: In the Zone/Spectrum Manager section, we will now assign a Spectrum Manager to manage the frequencies for a given zone. Selecting a Spectrum Manager for a given zone tells Wireless Workbench to deploy the full CFL for that zone to the specified Spectrum Manager.

    For More information on zones, check out the How do I create and utilize Zones? FAQ page.

    18edc5f27f_07.png

    NOTE: Only one Spectrum Manager can manage frequencies for a given zone. Also, you will only be able to assign a Spectrum Manager to manage a zone which the Spectrum Manager is currently in. To change the zone of a Spectrum Manager, change it's zone assignment from the Inventory view.

    Press "Deploy to Inventory" to send the CFL.

    The Deployment Summary dialog will open, showing the success of the deployment.

    18edc5f27f_08.png

    To confirm that the CFL from your last coordination was successfully sent to the Spectrum Manager you specified, lets open the device's properties panel and view the CFL live from the device. Navigate to the Inventory view, and right-click on the Spectrum Manager, and select "Properties...".

    18edc5f27f_09.png

    The Spectrum Manager properties panel shows a view of the CFL being monitored by the device (if any). The CFL view will show the in-use active device frequencies in the top portion, and the backups being monitored in the bottom section.

    18edc5f27f_10.png

    Confirm that the frequency list for the specified zone is tracked in the Spectrum Manager you designated in the RF Coordination Results dialog.

    Review Concepts

    As a quick primer, let's cover the basics of how the CFL fits in with your coordinated devices and Wireless Workbench.

    When Wireless Workbench performs frequency coordination, frequencies are either calculated for or analyzed around all channels in your inventory; this includes requested backup frequencies as well.

    The solution that results from frequency coordination is the Compatible Frequency List, or CFL. The list is significant to two entities: Wireless Workbench, and the Axient Spectrum Manager.

    Both Wireless Workbench and the Spectrum Manager can host a CFL. The Spectrum Manager, however, has a few extra capabilities enabling more control and automation with regards to the CFL. Namely, these capabilities include:

    • Editing the CFL (adding, changing, removing frequencies)
    • Monitoring backup frequencies (maintaining rank of all available frequencies)
    • Automatically dispatching backup frequencies to AXT400 receivers when interference occurs

    A CFL hosted by Wireless Workbench will not exhibit any of these features. It is for this reason that you would want to re-deploy a CFL coordinated offline to a Spectrum Manager once one is on your network.

  • Sam Drazin
    Deleting Backup Frequencies2
    Topic posted November 15, 2011 by Sam DrazinExpert, tagged how-to in Wireless Workbench > All Questions & Answers Topics public
    Title:
    Deleting Backup Frequencies
    Description:

    Overview

    Backup frequencies allow you to coordinate additional frequencies to switch out with your primary devices in the case of RF interference. Backup frequency management is a new feature to Wireless Workbench 6.

    Related Links

    What are Backup Frequencies?

    For a primer on what backup frequencies are and how they can be utilized, read the Adding Backup Frequencies page.

    Access

    Backup frequencies are not displayed in the Inventory view. They are displayed in the Channel Summary dialog. To access this dialog, navigate to the Frequency Coordination tab, and select the "Manage Channels..." button from the top right corner of the right sidebar.

    2e64d2d77f_01.png

    The Channel Summary dialog is where channels are specified to either receive new frequencies, or remain on their current values for the next coordination. It is also where you can manage your backup frequencies.

    Active Devices (items listed in your inventory) are listed in the top portion of the Channel Summary dialog, while backup frequencies are listed in the bottom portion.

    2e64d2d77f_02.png

    Deleting Backup Frequencies

    To delete backup frequencies, simply select them from the list such that the frequency row is outlined with a dotted line, and press the key. You can also right click on any row and select "Delete selected backup frequencies".

    2e64d2d77f_03.png

    The backup frequency will be removed from the Channel Summary dialog, and no longer be a requested frequency for the next coordination.

  • Sam Drazin
    Adding Backup Frequencies
    Topic posted November 15, 2011 by Sam DrazinExpert, tagged how-to in Wireless Workbench > All Questions & Answers Topics public
    Title:
    Adding Backup Frequencies
    Description:

    Overview

    Backup frequency management is a new feature to Wireless Workbench 6. You can request backup frequencies for networked and non-networked devices in advance, or configure Wireless Workbench to automatically calculate as many backup frequencies as possible.

    Related Links

    What Are Backup Frequencies?

    Backup frequencies are frequencies that are designated as spares for devices in your inventory. There are two classes of backup frequencies in Wireless Workbench:

    • Requested
    • Automatic

    Each of these types of backups are handled slightly differently within Wireless Workbench. They are explained in greater detail below.

    Requested Backups

    Requested backups are backup frequencies that you explicitly ask for. They can be added via the Add New Device dialog.

    Select the "Add new device" button from the global menu bar, and specify the Manufacturer, Model, and Band of the device you'd like to add backups for. Note that you can add active devices into your inventory at the same time while adding backup frequencies.

    To add only backup frequencies without adding devices into inventory, set the number of "Active Devices" to zero. Specify the number of backups you would like to add by entering that number in the "Backup Frequencies" field. Select "Add" to add them.

    459aedf126_01.png

    The status message at the bottom of the Add New Device dialog will confirm that they were successfully added. Backup frequencies are not displayed in the inventory view. Instead, they are shown in the bottom section of the Channel Summary dialog, accessible from the top right button within the Frequency Coordination tab.

    When you perform Frequency Coordination, you will see that your requested backup frequencies will be calculated by the frequency calculator. The count of successfully calculated backups will be shown in the "Backups" column of the RF Coordination Results panel.

    459aedf126_02.png

    NOTE: Under the Primary/Backups columns, X/Y is a ratio that indicates the number of found vs. requested frequencies, where:

    • X is the number of found frequencies
    • Y is the number of requested frequencies

    Check out the Frequency Coordination tutorial video for more information on Frequency Coordination.

    Automatic Backups

    Automatic backups are backup frequencies that Wireless Workbench can be configured to calculate. When this option is enabled, the frequency calculator will calculate as many backup frequencies as possible.

    NOTE: Calculation of automatic backup frequencies will only occur after all requested primary and backup frequencies have been found, so enabling this preference will never take precedence over your specified (requested) frequencies.

    To enable this option, open the Preferences menu, and access the Coordination tab. Check the preference that reads "Automatically calculate backup frequencies". Press "Save" to commit this change.

    459aedf126_03.png

    Now when you perform Frequency Coordination, you will see that all requested frequencies will be calculated first (primaries and backups). Once these frequencies have been calculated, automatic backup frequencies will begin to be calculated by the frequency calculator.

    The count of successfully calculated automatic backups will be shown in the "Backups" column of the RF Coordination Results panel. When automatic backups are found, you will see results like "54/4" in the Backups column, indicating that more frequencies were found than requested.

    The calculator will search for automatic backups until it appears that no more will be found. This may take some time, and you can stop the calculator at any time if sufficient backups have already been found. Press the "Stop" button to end the calculation and keep the results up to that point.

    459aedf126_04.png

    Check out the Frequency Coordination tutorial video for more information on Frequency Coordination.

    Adding Backup Frequencies to Existing Coordination

    You may find yourself in the situation where you want to add backup frequencies to an existing coordination. To do this, open the Add New Device dialog, and specify the backup frequencies you want to add (by selecting Manufacturer/Model/Band, and number of backups to add).

    NOTE: Be sure to specify the number of Active Devices as zero if you don't want to add any more primary devices to your inventory.

    You will now need to calculate new frequencies for only those newly added backups without changing the frequency values of the other channels in your existing coordination. This is done by selecting only the channels that should receive new frequencies (eg: the backups you just added) in the Channel Summary dialog.

    On the Frequency Coordination tab, select "Manage Channels..." to open the Channel Summary dialog.

    459aedf126_05.png

    The Channel Summary dialog is displayed. Every channel checked is slotted to receive a new frequency the next time frequency coordination is performed. In this example, we have two primary channels (AXT400 A) that already have frequency values, and we want to keep them there. We uncheck them to specify this.

    We added four backup frequencies to this coordination, all of which do not have frequency values and need to be coordinated. These will be checked. Select "OK" to commit these changes.

    NOTE: The Channel Summary dialog will retain the selection state of all channels. Be sure to inspect this window before you perform frequency coordination to ensure that the right selections are made.

    459aedf126_06.png

    The next time frequency coordination is performed, notice that no primary frequencies will be calculated, and only the four checked backups will receive new frequencies.

    459aedf126_07.png

    We have successfully added backup frequencies with compatible frequency values to an existing coordination without modifying our initial inventory.

    For a full description of how to select certain frequencies from the Channel Summary dialog (a.k.a. "Channel Management dialog"), consult the Add Frequencies to an Existing Coordination tutorial video.

  • Sam Drazin
    Setting up Channel Strips and Configuring the Monitor Tab2
    Topic posted November 15, 2011 by Sam DrazinExpert, tagged how-to in Wireless Workbench > All Questions & Answers Topics public
    Title:
    Setting up Channel Strips and Configuring the Monitor Tab
    Description:

    Overview

    The Monitor tab is a view of Wireless Workbench where you can display a set of parameters for all networked Shure wireless equipment in a single window. Channel strips display a set of channel parameters, and can be configured depending on the model of device.

    Related Links

    Relevant Devices

    Wireless Workbench 6 renders channel strips for networked Shure wireless microphone/PSM systems only. This includes the following devices:

    • AXT400 receivers
    • PSM1000 Transmitter
    • UHF-R receivers (UR4S, UR4D, MW4S, MW4D, UR4S+, UR4D+, etc...)

    With a properly configured network, you will be able to access the channel strips for any of the devices listed above. While online, you can control certain parameters of the physical devices themselves via Wireless Workbench.

    Access

    Channel strips are accessed from either the Monitor tab. You can view a channel strip for both offline and online devices. A device must be in the inventory for you to access it's channel strip. Either add devices from the Add New Device dialog, or discover them from your network.

    bbc316ec21_01.png

    Switch to the Monitor Tab. There are two portions of this view which you will interact with.

    • The column on the right is called the "Device Chooser". This will display all channels for which channel strips can be displayed in the "Channels" section.
    • The large area on the left with the dark background is the "Monitor View". When you select for channel strips to be displayed, this is where they will show up.

    bbc316ec21_02.png

    Display a Channel Strip

    To display a channel strip, click the channel of a device from the Device Chooser. The channel will be highlighted green, and its channel strip will be displayed on the Monitor View.

    bbc316ec21_03.png

    You can display as many channel strips as you would like at a given time.

    Configuring Channel Strips

    For each model/type of device, you can configure which parameters are displayed on its channel strip. Right-click anywhere in the Monitor View and select "Channel Strip Settings".

    bbc316ec21_04.png

    The Channel Strip Settings dialog is displayed. This dialog will allow you to specify which parameters will be shown for the different Shure wireless devices.

    First, you can dictate how many channel strips will be displayed per-row. The "Select number of channels per row" field will control how many strips-wide your layout will be before adding channel strips to the next row. This value is set to 14 by default.

    bbc316ec21_05.png

    Next, you will see tabs for each type of device. On the "Microphones" tab, you can add the parameters you would like to see for all microphone channel strips.

    Parameters on the left (under "Available Parameters") are not currently displayed, while parameters on the right (under "Current Channel Strip Configuration") are. To add parameters to be displayed, select them on the left, and select "Add".

    bbc316ec21_06.png

    Once you have added all desired settings for microphone channel strips, proceed on to PSM strips and follow the same steps.

    bbc316ec21_07.png

    Select "OK" to confirm your changes, and notice that your channel strips update to show the requested parameters.

    bbc316ec21_08.png

    Drag the channel strips into a different order to rearrange them. When you save a show file, the last channel strip configuration will be remembered.

    bbc316ec21_09.png

    Channel Groups

    You might have a group of channels that you associate with one-another, and always want to see at the same time. Wireless Workbench provides Channel Groups for this scenario.

    In the Device Chooser, expand the section entitled "Channel Groups".

    bbc316ec21_10.png

    Select "Add Group" and enter the name of your channel group.

    bbc316ec21_11.png

    Once created, you are ready to add channels to the group. Ensure that the channel is selected in the Channels area (highlighted green), and drag the channel's name to the Channel Group area, dropping it onto the group you'd like to add it to.

    bbc316ec21_12.png

    The channel name will be displayed under the group name when it has been successfully added.

    Continue to add selected channels to your group. Once complete, you can select the group from the Channel Groups area. When you select a channel group, it will hide all other channel strips being displayed, and only show that group.

    bbc316ec21_13.png

    You can build up multiple channel groups, and even include the same channels in multiple groups to customize displays within your Monitor View.

    This method is recommended when viewing large numbers of channels. Organizing them into groups will allow for quick access to a subset of channels, and keep the Monitor View uncluttered.

  • Sam Drazin
    Properties Panels
    Topic posted November 15, 2011 by Sam DrazinExpert, tagged how-to in Wireless Workbench > All Questions & Answers Topics public
    Title:
    Properties Panels
    Description:

    Overview

    Wireless Workbench will typically be a portion of a large system of Shure wireless components, including Axient, PSM1000, and UHF-R devices. Properties panels act as your window to the hardware, giving you almost full access of device parameters and controls from your computer running Wireless Workbench 6.

    Related Links

    Relevant Devices

    Wireless Workbench 6 renders properties panels for networked Shure wireless devices only. This includes the following devices:

    • AXT400 receivers
    • AXT600 Spectrum Manager
    • AXT610 ShowLink Access Point
    • AXT630/631 Antenna Distribution Amplifier
    • AXT900 Networked Charger
    • PSM1000 Transmitter
    • UHF-R receivers (UR4S, UR4D, MW4S, MW4D, UR4S+, UR4D+, etc...)

    With a properly configured network, you will be able to access the properties panels for any of the devices listed above. While online, you can control certain parameters of the physical devices themselves via Wireless Workbench.

    Access

    Properties panels can be accessed from either the Inventory view, or the Monitor tab. You can view a properties panel for both offline and online devices. A device must be in the inventory for you to access it's properties panel. Either add devices from the Add New Device dialog, or discover them from your network.

    08d396fb50_01.png

    Inventory View

    To access a device's properties panel from the Inventory view, right-click on the device and select "Properties...". The device's properties panel will be displayed.

    08d396fb50_02.png

    08d396fb50_03.png

    Monitor Tab

    To access a device's properties panel from the Monitor tab, that device's channel strip must be displayed. Consult the Setting up Channel Strips and Configuring the Monitor Tab page for more details on channel strips.

    Right-click on the device's channel strip and select "Properties". The device's properties panel will be displayed.

    08d396fb50_04.png

    Content

    Each series of device offers a different set of parameters and controls, and the corresponding properties panels align with those differences. Let's walk through each of the different properties panels and inspect the controls they present.

    UHF-R/MW Receivers

    Here is an example of the UR4D properties panel. This panel only represents one channel of the UR4D, and would look the same for a channel of an MW receiver, or a UR4S as well.

    08d396fb50_05.png

    There are three primary regions of controls on this panel.

    • The top-left area of the panel holds frequency settings, including the frequency, group and channel, band and TV channel of the device.
    • The top-right area of the panel holds more channel-specific information, including RF/audio meters, audio mute, transmitter tone key information, and firmware version of the device.
    • The bottom area of the panel is expandable and collapsible, and contains all network information for the device (shown expanded here).

    PSM1000 Transmitters

    Here is an example of the P10T properties panel. This panel only represents one channel of the PSM1000 transmitter.

    08d396fb50_06.png

    There are three primary regions of controls on this panel.

    • The top-left area of the panel holds frequency settings, including the frequency, group and channel, band, TV channel, and firmware version of the device.
    • The top-right area of the panel holds more channel-specific information, including audio meters, audio level, RF power, and RF Mute.
    • The bottom area of the panel is expandable and collapsible, and contains all network information for the device (shown collapsed here).

    Axient Receivers

    Here is an example of the AXT400 properties panel. This panel only represents one channel of the AXT400 receiver.

    08d396fb50_07.png

    There are three primary regions of controls on this panel.

    • The top-left area of the panel holds the RF/audio meters of the channel, and several device properties including Device ID and band.
    • The top-right area of the panel holds more channel-specific information, including transmitter tone key information, frequency, and group and channel.
    • The bottom area of the panel is expandable and collapsible, and contains four tabs of receiver properties
    • Radio: properties from the "Radio" menu of the front panel are kept here. Manage Interference Detection, Frequency Diversity mode, and various other settings relating to RF transmission here.

    08d396fb50_08.png

    • Audio: properties from the "Audio" menu of the front panel are kept here. Manage analog output, digital sample rate, and other audio settings here.

    08d396fb50_09.png

    • Utilities: properties from the "Util" menu of the front panel are kept here. Manage network settings, device locks, and other device-wide properties here.

    08d396fb50_10.png

    • Tx: properties from the "Tx" menu of the front panel are kept here. Manage linked transmitters and IR Presets here.

    08d396fb50_11.png

    Axient Spectrum Managers

    Here is an example of the AXT600 properties panel.

    08d396fb50_12.png

    The properties panel for the Spectrum Manager holds three main sections of controls.

    • The drop-down boxes on the left outline modifiable settings of the Spectrum Manager.
    • The table on the right is a live view of the Spectrum Manager's Compatible Frequency List, or CFL.
    • The bottom area of the panel is expandable and collapsible, and contains all network information for the device (shown collapsed here).

    With the live view of the CFL, you can observe the Spectrum Manager as it monitors all backup frequencies that it received during the last deployment, and watch each frequency's dBm level change with the shifting RF environment.

    Axient ShowLink Access Points

    Here is an example of the AXT610 properties panel.

    08d396fb50_13.png

    The Access Point properties panel shows several stats regarding the device's current state.

    • Set either Automatic or a specific channel to dictate where in the 2.4 GHz spectrum the Access Point operates.
    • The meter on the left shows the device's used capacity for device management.
    • The "Connected" section on the right shows all linked transmitters communicating through the device. Mouse over the Transmitter's Device ID to see the current ShowLink signal strength.
    • The bottom area of the panel is expandable and collapsible, and contains all network information for the device (shown collapsed here).

    Consult the Scanning the 2.4 GHz Spectrum page for more information on using the Access Point as a scanner.

    Axient Antenna Distribution Amplifiers

    Here is an example of the AXT630/AXT631 properties panel.

    08d396fb50_14.png

    There are a collection of device properties that can be set from this panel. Network settings are available from within the collapsible portion on the bottom (shown collapsed here).

    Axient Networked Chargers

    Here is an example of the AXT900 properties panel.

    08d396fb50_15.png

    Up to four battery bays with two slots each can be held by the AXT900. When populated, the battery color and text will display its percentage of current charge. Stats on the battery's health and life are listed below when a certain battery is selected.

    The bottom area of the panel is expandable and collapsible, and contains all network information for the device (shown collapsed here).

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